Tag Archives: Blitz

Blitz Adventures 16#: The Best Defense is a Good Offense

This game my opponent played a unique opening where I was able to exploit some of the weaknesses it produced. As you can see by the image below the f pawn has already been moved and is the only thing stopping checks coming from the King side. I coordinated a Knight sacrifice which opened the diagonal for the Queen to come into the fight Checking the King via the h4-f2 diagonal and subsequently wrecking the position on White’s King side while gaining a Rook. Further along in the the game I was able to throw my Queen away for another attack as the White King was suspiciously hanging out in the middle of the board.

View Full Game Analysis

Blitz 16
1. d4 Nf6 2. e3 e6 3. f4

 

 

Blitz Adventure #14: Nimzo-Larsen Mini Attack

This game ended in 18 moves and demonstrates the weakness of the Fianchetto Bishop and the power of the h pawn push in destabilizing the opponents defenses. It starts with a pure modern opening, that is with no direct control of the center from White while I play the classic direct control over the center of the board.

A typical idea for White is to play something like d4 breaking the center open with the help of the b2 Bishop, e4 Knight and d1 Queen behind it. My opponent wasted a move with Castling and it allowed me to play e4 myself locking d4 out and keeping the center quiet while I operated on the King side flank.

Full Game Review

Nimzo-Larsen Mini Attack
1. b3 e5 2. Bb2 Nc6 3. g3 d5 4. Bg2 Nf6 5. e3 Be6 6. Ne2

Blitz Adventures #13: Blackmar-Diemer Gambit

After the previous success with the Blackmar-Diemer gambit I have been throwing it around more in the 10-min blitz pool with a decent win rate. I’ve noticed that Nf6 is the most popular response attempting to keep the pawn even though 3…c6 leads to a transposition of the Caro Kann which is a calmer but lesser known opening especially in the 1200 elo range. This game showcases the power of connected Rooks on the 7th rank leading to mate in 4 as the Queen jumps in.

View Game Analysis

Blitz 13
1. d4 d5 2. e4 dxe4 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. f3 exf3 5. Nxf3 Bg4 6. Be2

Blitz Adventures #12: Playing Flashy

I am incredibly excited to be able to present and analyze this game seeing as how the Blackmar-Diemer gambit is one of my favorite openings, it is also one of only a few gambits playable after 1.d4 for White. I believe it captures the spirit of chess akin to the Romantic Era (15th-18th century) where quick and tactical battles were more popular instead of long term and positional play. As with most gambits if opponents aren’t very well prepared even the most dubious gambits can be dangerous. Later on in the game following a successful opening I get a little flashy and sacrifice a Rook for a pawn forcing a Queen trade and a weaker Black King.

View Game Analysis

Blitz 12
1.d4 d4 2.e4

Blitz Adventures #11: Mate in 17

This was a quick game blitz game that ended in 17 moves from a completely equal position which makes it a little unique, most times a blunder takes a few moves to really exploit. My opponent opted for the Scotch game (Thanks to my Uncle’s tendency to play this I have a few things prepared) and I answered with the Intermezzo Variation which is not quite as accurate as the main line but threatens Mate in 1 if White doesn’t answer properly. There are a lot of decent ways to reply however some do create holes in the defense of White’s structure which I was able to take advantage of this time around. I’ll go into more detail in the game analysis below about possible replies and their short comings.

View Game Analysis

Blitz 11
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nxd4 Bc5 5. Nxc6 Qf6 (Threatens mate on f2)

 

Blitz Adventures #10: Bob the Brave Bishop

I want to start off by saying dark square Bishop Bob you served well and boldly gave your self to bring the White King out of hiding, your sacrifice was not in vain. The game in question is a 22 turn miniature blitz following the Giuoco Piano Game: Main Line, Giuoco Pianissimo Variation which is mainline until the 6th move. As you can see in the position below the board is almost identical on both side except for the Knight Black has on c6 where as white has pushed his pawn to c3 instead. From this point on some questionable moves are played by White, not necessarily bad but somewhat slow and in the end deciding to forgo castling and play overly aggressively lost them the game.

Guccico Piano Blitz #10
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d3 d6

View Game

Chess Strategy #1: Doubled Pawns

In this post I wanted to talk about the idea of creating and exploiting stacked pawns that can occur early on in a game. When I first started playing I opened with the Ruy Lopez as many new players do. It was common, well studied and had a solid set up for white with good attacking and tactical chances. I traded the Bishop for Knight on c6 early instead of keeping pins and pressure on pieces, of course later on I learned of the benefits of the latter. I wont discount the idea of stacking an opponents pawns early on, especially if the player is lower rated. It provides and early weakness and a clear target to work towards from the opening. As you’ll see in this game I was able to stack Blacks pawns early and plant a Knight on e6 waiting until it was clear to attack. Doubled pawns aren’t always a problem, the second game is one I played as Black where I used the stacked pawns to my advantage and involved them into my position and attack instead of letting it become a weakness.

Strat #1
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. Bxc6 bxc6

View Game

 

Strat #1-2
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Bc5 4. Bxc6 dxc6 5. Nxe5 Qf6 6. Nf3 Bg4 7. e5 Qf5 8. d4 Qe4+ 9. Be3 Bb6 10. Nc3 Qf5 11. h3 Bxf3 12. gxf3 O-O-O

View Game